Archeologists Prove That Debated Skeleton Of Viking-Warrior Is Female

Archeologists Prove That Debated Skeleton Of Viking-Warrior Is Female

Archeologists opened a chamber in an important Viking trade center as Birka back in 1878 and found the remains of they assessed as a high-ranking Viking warrior.
The person was in the chamber together with their weapons, two horses, and grand clothes, and they assumed that the remains were male.

However, a DNA study concluded in 2017 that the remains were biologically female.

Some critics of the recent findings argued that the weapons could have belonged to her husband, or that there are maybe two skeletons in the grave. They also argued that women couldn’t possibly be Viking warriors, and that it’s just “wishful thinking and that we don’t have enough historical evidence to support the claim”.

A journal named Antiquity, though, supports the claims of the researchers, and says that the remains that were buried in the chamber are “unassailably female”. To add to that, they confirm that there was only one skeleton there.

Professor Neil Price confirmed to IFLScience that the grave had only one human occupant, and an extra thigh-bone in the Bj. 581 museum storage box, which was much hyped by online critics, is clearly labeled as coming from another box and it has been misplaced in the wrong box.

He assured the world that the individual has been shown to be female.

The archeologists say that we’ll probably find more and more Viking female warriors in the future, and it seems that not only the future, but the past is female too.

 
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