City Council Voted Down A Rainbow Crosswalk, Residents Respond By Painting 16 Of Them

City Council Voted Down A Rainbow Crosswalk, Residents Respond By Painting 16 Of Them

The city council of Chilliwack, British Columbia, voted down a proposal to install a rainbow crosswalk in the city in September 2019. According to dissenters, the crosswalk would be seen as a “political statement” and would be “divisive”.

Yahoo! News reports, however, that no matter the decision, people of Chilliwack have already installed 16 rainbow crosswalks on privately owned property.
As it is often the case with social justice issues, Indigenous people in the area have led the way, and two rainbow crosswalks were painted at a shopping center development on Squiala First Nation land, and two more on Tzeachten First Nation land.

Dave Jimmie, president of the Ts’elxweyeqw Tribe, told Maple Ridge News that the city doesn’t have jurisdiction over their lands, so they’re free to paint them to demonstrate their support for being an inclusive community. He added that he recently lost a friend from the LGBTQ community, so this is truly near and dear to his heart.

To add to that, another rainbow crosswalk was installed at the Chilliwack School District office.

11 more rainbow crosswalks have been installed in the city by residents of Chilliwack, and Amber Price, a local resident who began the effort to get city council to approve the rainbow crosswalks says that she’d love to see the town recognized as a world record holder for the most rainbow sidewalks.

Amber Price, a local resident who spearheaded the effort to get city council to approve a crosswalk, says she’d love to see the town recognized as a world record holder for the most rainbow sidewalks.

“The surge in rainbow crosswalks at our local schools sends a beautifully clear message to our LGBTQ+ youth. We see you. We support you. We celebrate you. You are loved” – she told Chilliwack Progress.

 
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