Finland’s PM Considers 4-Day Workweek With 6-Hour Workdays So People Can Spend More Time With Their Family

Finland’s PM Considers 4-Day Workweek With 6-Hour Workdays So People Can Spend More Time With Their Family

As we all know and probably are a part of, most of the Western world works 9 to 5, five days a week. The 9-5 has been taken as a norm, and the 5-day workweek has been around for years. However, some countries have expressed their concerns about this system, and they have tried to “hack” the current system of productivity and introduce a four-day working week.
Microsoft Japan was one of the first companies to try the four-day workweek in Japan, and the results were beyond satisfying, as the company noticed an almost 40 percent increase in productivity with the new system.
Finland’s new PM, Sanna Marin, has also mentioned the four-day workweek in her campaign, and she has some additional thoughts as to why she believes a four-day workweek is beneficial for society and for companies.

Even though the news of Marin’s plan broke out on the internet, the Finish government released a statement on January 7 in which they explained that even though the idea was brought up by Marin before her election, it is not currently included in the Government’s agenda.

The 34-year-old PM of the Finish government came up with a truly beautiful plan before she was elected. She planned to change the understanding of what the typical work hours in the country are, and one of the plans included introducing a four-day working week with six-hour shifts.
Yes, you read that right. While Microsoft Japan introduced a four-day working week with 10 hours shifts, Marin’s plan was to introduce a four-day working week with 6-hour shifts. She said that believes people deserve to spend more time with their families and their loved ones, or with their hobbies and other aspects of life, such as culture.
According to Marin, the country would prosper more if the citizens could spend more time with their families and loved ones.

The PM believes that it’s important for Finish citizens to work less because she wants to offer help and keep her promises to voters. Sweden, Finland’s neighboring country introduced a shorter work-week in 2015, and the results showed that the employees were happier, wealthier, and more productive.

This is the statement that was published by the Finish government:

This is what people think about the idea:

 
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