Mom Shares A Powerful Post About Signs Of PPD So People Can Finally Start Talking About It

Mom Shares A Powerful Post About Signs Of PPD So People Can Finally Start Talking About It

Mom’s Powerful Post About Signs Of Postpartum Depression Goes Viral, And It’s Something That Every Woman Has To ReadKrysti Motter spoke honestly and hauntingly on the matter in a Facebook post that went viral, and she explained not only how a new mom might be so sick that she runs away from her kids or harms herself, but also how her cries for help are rarely noticed by someone who isn’t personally familiar with the condition.

After she explained what it feels like to suffer from PPD, she went on to list some of the signs: she complains that she’s drowning or that she’s behind, she’s too busy or too stressed to see you…

“There’s your signs. Stop saying you didn’t know. Because she told you,” – Motter writes.

She also mentioned what people on the outside can do to help. She thinks that it’s good to stop by and visit her, let her take a shower, help her somehow so she doesn’t feel that she’s behind, like she’s alone.

This illness and its consequences are all too real! Believe it or not, suicide is the number one cause of death for women for the first year postpartum in the world, and that’s including complications from childbirth. Yes, that’s right: the number of deaths of mothers who chose to take their own lives is bigger than the number of mothers that lost their lives due to childbirth complications. However, the main problem is that very often both mothers themselves and those around them write off the symptoms of the “baby blues”, PPD, and even postpartum psychosis.
The symptoms of PPD include anxiety, depression, mood swings, irritability, a loss of interest in things a new mom used to enjoy, thoughts of self-harm, or even thoughts of hurting their newborn child.

If you think that you or someone might be suffering from PPD, make sure to get the help you or them get the help they need, and you can also support them in a number of ways. Make sure to check in often to ask how they’re feeling and make sure you listen, offer to help them find a doctor to talk to them about their depression symptoms, offer to watch their kids while they’re on their appointment, help them around the house, cook for them, do some laundry, let them take that damn nap, let them take that long and much needed shower!

 
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