Vintage Photos Of Bada$$ American Suffragists Who Secured Out Right To Vote

Vintage Photos Of Bada$$ American Suffragists Who Secured Out Right To Vote

Women were not allowed to vote in many places across the U.S. before 1920, and only after a long and arduous fight by the suffragettes in both Congress and in the streets, the 19th Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution. The decree read:

“The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of gender.”

The poster on the left reads: “The Ballot will secure a Woman no Right that she Needs and does not Possess”, and a group of men in Washington D.C. is seen tearing up such suffrage banners and heckling a group of women that were boycotting at the White House in 1917.

Vida Milholland was arrested after picketing for suffrage at the White House in 1917, and she served three days in District Jail. Helena Hill Weed (right), a vice-president of the Daughters of the American Revolution, was also arrested the same day and she was sentenced to three days in jail. She was arrested again in January 1918 for applauding in court and she was sentenced to 24 hours, and she was arrested yet again in August 1918 for participating in a Lafayette Square suffrage meeting and she was sentenced to 15 days.

This is Harriet Tubman, the former slave who led over 300 escaped slaves to freedom through the Underground Railroad, and an outspoken advocate for women’s suffrage following the Civil War.

Mary Church Terrel was a teacher, writer, and an activist, and she signed the charter that established the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs in 1909 under the motto “Lifting As We Climb”.

 
Comments
 
Comments

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply