Woman Creates A Simple Flowchart For Men Who Won’t Stop Mansplaining

Woman Creates A Simple Flowchart For Men Who Won’t Stop Mansplaining

Mansplaining, with a definition:
*explain something to someone, typically a woman, in a manner regarded as condescending or patronizing* – seems to be a pretty common problem these days.

To be fair, it doesn’t necessarily need to be a gendered issue, because of the fact that there will always be arrogant people that feel a satisfaction when putting someone else down.

Writer and designer Kim Goodwin used the Twitter platform to share a chart that she named “Am I Mansplaining?”

It would be great if this was distributed to every office, home, and social situation.

Read her chart and the comments that she got below, so tell us what you think.

 
Comments
 
Comments

Great Googly Moogly! I love how so many people chimed in on this article with, “…but women….”

The article very clearly states, “To be fair, it doesn’t necessarily need to be a gendered issue, because of the fact that there will always be arrogant people that feel a satisfaction when putting someone else down.”

Kim Goodwin didn’t create this flowchart to imply that only men ever overexplain things to someone who already knows what the heck they’re doing. She created it because colleagues asked her about this particular topic.

That’s not dismissing the fact that women can also talk down to people or implying that ALL of either gender do it.

When someone is discussing a topic and anyone pipes in with, “But what about….” the effect is to downplay the actual topic at hand and often to refocus the conversation on something that actually happens with less frequency. It’s a tactic to diminish a concern and it’s not useful.

Yes, in any profession predominantly occupied by one gender, the minority gender is likely to experience condescending explanations. And it ALWAYS sucks when people underestimate you. No one anywhere is disputing that or implying it doesn’t happen.

However, over the course of our history, which gender has held the power, the jobs, the education and also restricted others from having access to those same things? The result is that in most professions, women are the minority. And in far greater numbers, we experience this condescending form of communication as professionals, and frankly anywhere.

I had a boyfriend, who was not born or raised in this country, ask me a question about what a traffic sign meant while we were driving. I responded with, “I think it means…” His reply, “Why can’t you just admit you don’t know?” Me: “Um, what? You asked a question. I told you what I thought it meant. And as I was raised here and have more driving experience in this country, forgive me for making an educated guess.” At this point, I was also irritated and so Googled the matter, pointing out that my “guess” was correct.

So this person didn’t know, asked a question, and then tried to belittle me for daring to answer him. (He’s obviously not my boyfriend anymore.) And yet he tried to position himself as the person with more knowledge on the matter even though all facts, and his actions, pointed to the opposite conclusion.

That’s the kind of thing women experience daily, at work, socially, in random interactions, etc. And that’s what the article was addressing.

If the article were titled, “How to tell if you’re being a Know-It-All instead of just being helpful,” then it’d be fair for us all to lament any time some arrogant person has assumed we don’t know anything without actually finding out.

(And no, it’s not lost on me that I’m also sounding very “woman-splainy” discussing the article and why some people were irritated by all the “but women do it too” comments. But since the article was about mansplaining, which is a thing done TO women, my point is not to make anyone feel bad but to call attention to the key details some people seem to be ignoring – that the article already acknowledges other people do this and that Kim Goodwin created this because she was asked and not to just be snarky at her colleagues.)

69 years old and I’ve never seen it ‘splained so well. Thanks. And I too will be copying this out and giving it to those who deserve to read it.

Some of you are getting this all wrong. It’s not about explaining to someone “struggling” or not understanding something. It’s when men, ASSUME they know more about a subject than you do, and explain it without asking. It happens all the time. If I ask a man for information fine, but don’t just assume I don’t know because I’m a woman.

You forgot a bubble in the chart.

Will her believing the things she believes create injustice and increase the misery of the world?

No? Carry on.
Yes? A discussion involving both sides listening to each other needs to occur, regardless of gender of the parties.

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